Wednesday, February 5, 2014

They Say I Say Chapter 4 HW

TSIS Chapter 4 Summary:
There are three ways to let a reader know where you stand. By agreeing, disagreeing or both agreeing and disagreeing.
When you disagree: You cant just claim that you disagree, you have to give persuasive reasons why u disagree. We need to show that we have a piece of information to contribute to the discussion or argument. Another way can be that we disagree by agreeing to part but not all of the other statements. With this we still need to add our own points.

When you agree: You have to agree but with a difference, meaning, you have to bring new ideas as to why you agree with the statement or argument.

When you agree and disagree simultaneously you construct a complex argument. It allows the reader to have a few options on the map. You can either agree and disagree while stressing one response over another or you can show the pros and cons and not actually be decisive as whether u agree or disagree.

Exercise 1:
 For my essay #3 I chose to use the article "Watching TV Makes You Smarter" by Steven Johnson and I found an article called "Thinking outside the idiot box" by Dana Stevens that directly states that she disagrees with Johnson's claim that watching TV makes you smarter and is growing in complexity.

"If watching TV really makes you smarter, as Steven Johnson argued in an article in yesterday's New York Times Magazine (an excerpt from his forthcoming book) then I guess I need to watch a lot more of it, because try as I might, I could make no sense of Johnson's piece."- This shows that she disagrees with Johnson.

"If watching TV really makes you smarter, as Steven Johnson argued in an article in yesterday's New York Times Magazine (an excerpt from his forthcoming book) then I guess I need to watch a lot more of it, because try as I might, I could make no sense of Johnson's piece. As far as I can tell, his thesis is that television shows have slowly grown more and more complicated over the last two decades (this paradigm shift apparently having begun with Hill Street Blues, the Gutenberg Bible of the smart-TV era), so that now, like rats in a behaviorist's maze, trained viewers can differentiate among up to 12 distinct plot lines in shows like The Sopranos. (The technical term for this great leap forward in human cognition: "multi-threading.")"-here Dana first introduces what Johnson says(his claim) - "They say"


"In other words, if I understand correctly, watching TV teaches you to watch more TV—a truth already grasped by the makers of children's programming like Teletubbies, which is essentially a tutorial instructing toddlers in the basics of vegging out."- here Dana states her idea and gives an example to prove her response. -"I say"

Dana also includes some examples Johnson has written in his essay and proves why she disagrees with his examples.

Overall, Dana Stevens disagrees with Johnson. She believes that TV in today's society doesn't make you smarter.

4 comments:

  1. Hi Shirel, Good job in founding the evidence in the text. I think this is a well picked article. You are going to do great at this essay. You have your ideas well write and the summary is also good.

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  2. I absolutely agree with Mari, you broke down the article into the key points which make it more clear, especially if the reader didn't read the actual article. The evidence that were brought up in Ex. #1 was very straight forward, however I think you should shorten the quotes that you are using. But overall, very useful information.

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