Thursday, January 9, 2014

The Narrative Power

The Art of Immersion: Fear of Fiction by Frank Rose is an article about the great power the narratives have over their audience and with the advance of technology that power multiplies. Rose gives examples of how the power of the narrative is increased by each method that is used to convey it’s story. For instance he talks about a satire novel by Miguel de Cervantes and in it a man named Don Quixote was reading all day and night and because of that he felt the need to transform himself into a night because of the books that he was reading. During the time of industrialization in london serialization started to become popular and because of men like Don Quixote a new author named charles dickens was inspired by the thought of having the audience so immersed and eventually became well known for having readers drift off from reality. To take things up a notch Rose talks about Ray Bradbury book and the book talked about how television is having a stronger hold on people and books took a backseat. Bradbury problem was that television was too real entrancing. Furthermore with technology advancing you have a movie like “Avatar” with its 3-D effects propel things even more. Rose says how a writer in Time magazine wrote he could tell what was real or animated in the movie and the next morning he had the urge to return to a place in the movie as if it was real. Moreover with technology the internet is the new medium that have the power to put people in a trance and concluded that people want to be immersed into something that is not real at all.
Rose’s belief that we don’t want “authenticity”  but what we really want is the opposite I think that is true. In his passage when he refers to the writer for “time” magazine wanting to go back to pandora I think that shows people like to fantasize just to escape reality for a moment. Just like “A Christmas Carol” I believe that book appealed to snobby wealthy men like Scrooge and by reading books that’s almost practical to there life it just makes them want to read more and that’s why they're so into the narrative.

4 comments:

  1. I agree with you about people wanting fantasy (not all though). Do you think they wanted to read more (the wealthy, snobby men) because they wanted to see how much Dickens was spilling the beans on their behavior?

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    1. Good questions, CiTi!

      And not a bad post, Sean, but some of your ideas don't quite add up :-/

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  2. Yes Citi I do believe that these men wanted to read more because of that reason just to see how far Dickens will go with it

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    1. Oh, ok, cool! They probably was upset. Lol.

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