Thursday, July 18, 2013

Ebonics vs Academic English

Original Paragraph: (Page 128)

Although it may have been in the past, academic writing in most disciplines today is no longer the linguistic equivalent of a black-tie affair. To succeed as a writer in college, then, you need not always limit your language to the strictly formal. Although academic writing does rely on complex sentence patterns and on specialized, disciplinary vocabularies, it is surprising how often such writing draw on the language of the street, popular culture, our ethnic communities, and home. It is by blending these languages on what counts as "standard" English changes over time and the range of possibilities open to academic writers continue to grow.

Dress It Down:

Even if it be long-ago, the punishment of writing fancy words is no longer the thing. Wanna pull off writing like a pro? Well then, don’t be limiting your tongue; that means acting all serious in your writing. Though academic writing counts on difficult sentence structures and hard words, it's surprising how often our street lingos and ways of life surround our writing. It be as a result of joining these languages together making it into what they label "standard" English which changes and will continue to do so while academic writers continue to grow.

Dress It Up:

While befalling into the precedents, scholastic inscription, at the moment, essentially has no longer become the linguistic equivalent of a black-tie affair. To accomplish as a novelist, subsequently, you must not always limit your verbal communication to the strictly formal. Although scholastic inscription does rely on intricate sentence patterns and on specific, disciplinary terminologies, it is astonishing how frequently such inscription employs the verbal communications on what is considered as "standard" English revolves ultimately and the variety of possibilities open to scholastic novelists continue to cultivate.

Mix It Up:

While it may have befallen into the past, academic writing nowadays has no longer become this punishment of writing the same old fancy words. To accomplish as a writer, you must not always limit your tongue, meaning limiting your verbal communication to the strictly formal. Though academic writing does rely on difficult sentence structures and intricate vocabulary, it is surprising how frequently such writing draws on joining these languages together making it into what they label "standard" English which changes frequently and will continue to do so while academic writers continue to cultivate.


              In this chapter George Graff and Cathy Birkenstein explain how we can write effective academic arguments while holding on to our voice. Academic writing doesn’t always mean setting aside your own voice; using “big words, long sentences, and complex sentences” is not necessarily important to always use in one’s academic writing. It is rather better to use sophisticated academic words, but in order to keep hold of one’s voice while writing their piece of work, one should draw up their expressions and use their phrases using their everyday conserving language too. They suggest that we shouldn’t avoid using sophisticated, academic terms in writing, and encourage us to draw upon the kinds of expressions and the phrases we use every day when having a conversation with family and friends. It is also suggested that everyday language shouldn’t be accepted in academic writing. A writer should never limit his or her own choice of words while writing; yet a good writer should always experiment with their own personal everyday colloquial language and improve it.

Shining on a problem

Dick Hallorann is a character in Stephen King's novel, The Shining. He is a single black man. He is the cook and a groundskeeper at the Overlook Hotel. He takes instant liking to Danny, the son of Jack Torrance. Danny a has powers called The Shine (psychic powers). Hallorann has the same thing allowing him to understand him. Jack Torranc and his family are staying at the Overlook Hotel for the winter as caretakers. All the evil ghosts of the hotel drove him crazy causing him to have a complete psychotic break. Danny rings for Hallorann for help. Hallorann drops whatever he was doing in Florida and leaves. He fights his way into the Hotel beating the animals.  Then he is knocked out by the crazy father Jack.  Sadly Dick is killed off with an axe right when he was going to save Danny.
This relates and fits into Dexter because in the film, Hallorann is even more strongly portrayed as the Magical Negro when he is brutally murdered when he enters the hotel, and choosing to save the white character in order for them to fulfill his/her purpose. Most Magical Negros parts consists of having these following traits, being a convicted, poor, uncivilized, a misfit, loud, and black. Hallorann had these traits, same as the character "Brother Sam" from the show Dexter. If you seen the show you know that is exactly how a Magical Negro is portrayed in Brother Sam.  His main purpose was the help and guide Dexter so we can live a better life and go to heaven after he his dead. He believes in this purpose so much not realizing it's caused his death.
Work Cited
King, Stephen The Shining. New York City: Doubleday, January 28, 1977. Print.

“Once upon a time.”  Dexter Sixith Season. HB0,  801 production Los Angeles September 12 2011. Televison.

Video Games are an art form.

Why Video Games Are Works of Art by Kyle Chayka explains how Video Games are an art form just like Movies, Television, Music, and even Physical Art pieces fit into the category of Art. Chayka makes the argument that as we play any video game we take time to enjoy artistic form, and how we take into consideration its visual beauty.
"But video games are nothing if not experiential. They are visuals and music and poetry all wrapped up into a single package. A video game isn't just a game-it is a controlled passage through an overwhelming aesthetic experience." (Chayka 397)


Wednesday, July 17, 2013

Chick Flick

    Essay 3 will be about one of the films mentioned by Linda Seger in her article "Creating the Myth." The film being Romancing the Stone, which star was a female. At the time the film was made more women were given leading role. The article found "Chick Flicks: Contemporary Women at the Movies" by Susan Ferriss and Mallory Young provides a historical overview of the journey of women in movies, from the "weepies" of the 1920s and 30s to the warriors of today. Such films were and are still considered chick flicks as they targeted the female population and in the case of Romancing the Stone is also considered a romantic comedy.



Works Cited
Jackson, Kathy Merlock. "Chick Flicks: Contemporary Women At The Movies By Suzanne Ferriss And Mallory Young, Editors." Journal Of American Culture 32.1 (2009): 79. Academic Search Complete. Web. 17 July 2013

Essay number 3, Television Addiction is No Mere Metaphor

One of the articles I chose to contribute to this essay is a novel called The Stone Cold Truth. This novel explains the life of Steve Austin (former WWE Superstar) and how television, being on it that is, made such a huge impact on both his professional wrestling life, and personal life.

Works Cited
Steve Austin, Jim Ross, The WWE, WWE, By Steve Austin, and the WWE The Stone Cold Truth. Book, Sept 2004.

Video Games in the Real World ESSAY 3

Reality is Broken: Why Games Makes Us Better and Can Change The World by Jane  McGonigal explains how video games can help you outside the imaginary world that is Video Games. Claiming that gamers are happier, how very big games can change the world,  and how it's reinventing reality.
Life is hard, and games make it better.” (page 349)
“What the world needs now are more epic wins: opportunities for ordinary people to do extraordinary things — like change or save someone’s life — every day”. (page 247)

Cites Cited

Reality is Broken: Why Games Makes Us Better and Can Change The World by Jane  McGonigal The Penguin Express Inc Hudson Street, New York, New York  10014 Print. 2011

Portion Sizes and Obesity: Responses of Fast-Food Companies

This
        This scholarly article discusses the  effects of the fast food industry. The health effects on citizens economically, physically, and mentally. Much is covered on the pressure the companies put on people to enjoy this horrible food. They discuss the sizing of the meals in McDonalds and featuring the movie Supersize Me. The article goes into depth and evidence of the horrifying sizing in America's fast food. Authors Young and Nestle show the illusion that fast food is delicious and acceptable. American citizens are slowly losing their health to these food chains and bringing about obesity issues.

Young, Lisa R., and Marion Nestle. "Portion Sizes and Obesity: Responses of Fast-Food Companies." Journal of Public Health Policy. 2nd ed. Vol. 28. N.p.: Palgrave Macmillan Journals, n.d. 238-48. Ser. 2007. JSTOR. Palgrave Macmillan Journals, 2007. Web. 17 July 2013. <http://www.jstor.org/stable/4498959>.

Ain't so/ Is not

Exercise 2

(Intro from ENG12 essay)
What comes to mind when you hear the news of a new born? Or when you invited to a baby shower? The most common response would be “is it a girl” or “is it a boy”. As a matter of fact this is a very big question to answer. Marketing has programmed into believing what is gender appropriate and what is not. From a very young age kids are tricked into believing what  they should or should not like based on stereotypical gender toys, colors, activities, and carriers. Women are generally targeted for “house wife” and boys to be more “adventurous” and “outgoing”. This set up creates a gender gap and major inequality.

I feel as though the beginning starts off as a more casual conversation with the reader. Later on presents the facts and sets a more serious tone. There would be no space to add on more or less casual or academic structure for the appropriate audience with the subject and the point trying to get across.  There is a good balance, I believe. 


Original Essay/ Excercise 2 Chapter Nine

These are two pieces from my Inspirational Essay in English 12
Experiences teach us life lessons so that when we engage in those experiences, we  become prepared for them and can overcome any obstacles through interaction with significant people in our lives; The experience in life that has changed me was my open heart surgeries. I have had three open heart surgeries in my life, and besides the obvious love from my family, my mother has cared for me the most. My mother was the most important person in my life, who inspired me and was my mentor  who guided me through the toughest experience of my life.
My experience is as  follows. It was a hot summer day in June of 2008. Having known that I’m about to have surgery in a month, I go to school to take my Spanish regents. I am in the lunch room talking with my friends eating a sandwich my mother had prepared for me earlier that morning. Ten minutes before the bell is to sound, I dropped to one knee. In shock my friend was asking if I was alright. I told my friend I didn’t know what was happening. He asked me if I could make it to Spanish to take the final exam. I told him I felt weak and felt it best to call my mother. He brought me to the nurses office down the hall. The hall at that point looked like it was a mile long, considering how ill I was  feeling. When we arrived at the nurses office, I called my mom, and within a second flash she was there. My mother brought me home and called my cardiologist to see what was going in. So she gotten the phone and the cardiologist told my mom that the weakness, and shortness of breath, were all symptoms of the urgency for \this specific surgery. Even though I was scared, I felt ready for this challenge of my life.

What I notice about my essay from these two parts at least is that I use I a lot. Even though I am the one writing and I know that the professor knows it's me writing I wrote I way too much. How I would fix this problem is by:

Having three open heart surgeries throughout the duration of my life, and besides all the love from my family, my mother has cared for me the most. My mother was the most important person in my life, who inspired me and was my mentor  who guided me through the toughest experience of my life.

Why You Mad Because I'm Styling on ya !

 
Original Paragraph 

Have you ever gotten the impression that writing well in college means setting aside the kind of language you use in everyday conversation? Those to impress your instructors you need to use big words, long sentences, and complex sentence structures? If so, then we’re here to tell you that it ain’t necessarily so. On the contrary, academic writing can --- and in our view should ---- be relaxed, easy to follow, and even a little bit fun. Although we don’t want to suggest that you avoid using sophisticated, academic terms in your writing, we encourage you to draw upon the kinds of expressions and turns of phrase that you use every day when conversing with family and friends. In this chapter, we want to show you how you can write effective academic arguments while holding on to some of your own voice.
   

Dressed It Down  

  
Have you ever had that feeling that writing one of those A type papers in college meant throwing the lingo you use every day with your peoples’ right? You know to impress the teach by using 100 dollar words, long sentences, and O.D. complicated sentences and what not? Well, if that’s what you’re thinking, I’m here to let you know that’s not a hunet percent true. On the flip side, academic writing can –and in our view should – be a little more chill, easy going, and even a little bit fun. Although we don’t want to steer you completely away from using experience, bookish terms in your writing, we sway you to bring about the kind of expressions and word of choice you use every day when talking to family and friends. In this chapter we want to show you how you can write direct college arguments while still doing your thing.


Dressed It Up


          Have you at all gain the perception that writing sufficiently in a institution of higher education equals abandoning the brand of verbalization you address your peers with in a everyday conversation? That to thrill your professors you’re obligated to use a larger vocabulary, drawn out sentences, and intricate sentence organization? If so, then we’re here to advise you that is not entirely so. On the contrary, academic writing can --- and in our view be composed, flow with ease, and as well as fun. Although we do not want to advise that you avoid using sophisticated, academic terms in your writing, we encourage you to draw upon the kinds of expressions and unique verbiage that you embrace every day when conversing with family and friends. In this chapter, we aspire to demonstrate to you how you can write effective academic arguments while holding onto some of your own expression. 


Mixed It Up

  

          Have you at all gain the perception that writing one of those A type of papers in an institution of higher education meant throwing out the lingo you use to address your peers with in a everyday conversation? You know to impress your professor by using 100 dollar words, drawn out sentences, and O.D. complicated sentence organization? If so, we’re here to tell you, that is not entirely so. On the contrary, academic writing can --- and in our view should be a little more chill, follow with ease, as well as fun. Although we do not want to advise that you using experience, bookish terms in your writing, we encourage you to draw upon the kinds of expressions and words of choice you embrace every day when talking with family and friends. In this chapter, we aspire to demonstrate to you how you can write academic arguments while still doing your thing.  

Not Losing Myself

 In They Say/ I Say by Gerald Graff chapter nines essay Ain't So/ Is So authors Kathy Birkenstein and Russell Durst offer their ideas about how "you do not need to lose your voice" in your academic writings. They warn to use caution that if you are writing a letter to a prospective employer it is best for you to use formal language. However, when writing college level essays they believe that you can blend both your "street" vocabulary with your academic language to better relay your or to capture the reader. 

I will be using an excerpt from an essay I wrote in English 12 titled "My Writing Skills" demonstrating if I used any of my everyday expressions rather than academic expressions.

Initial Writing:

"My first thought about english 12 was that it was going to be complicated. After 12 years of no schooling, I was sure I had forgotten how to write a proper paper, one that is properly structured with correct grammar. The fear of not being able to write a proper paper was my greatest weakness. A weakness that would hinder my grade on future papers. Another weakness being the difficulty I have in writing an introduction. Introducing the topic is not a problem but creating a thesis statement or the placement of a thesis statement is often difficult.I also have trouble with being repetitive, I find myself saying the same thing over and over in a paper but in different ways. I have hopes to improve this sooner rather than later".

Re-Write:

My first thoughts about English 12 were that it was going to be complicated. I was sure I had forgotten how to write an academic paper, one that is properly structured with correct grammar. The apprehension that I felt was my greatest weakness, a weakness that could hinder my overall grade. There were a plethora of weaknesses associated with my academic writing. To start I had great difficulty in creating a thesis statement, not only that I did not know the correct placement of the thesis statement. I am often repetitive in my writing I have hopes to improve this sooner rather than later.

Tuesday, July 16, 2013

Dress it up, Dress it down then Mix it up

Exercise 1: paragraph taken from page 195 TSIS

Original Paragraph:
        
        I grew up as a typical mid 1980s latchkey kid. My parents were split up, my dad off trying to rebuild his life, my mom working long hours to make the monthly bills. Lunch and dinner, for me, was a daily choice between Mc Donald's, Taco Bell, Kentucky Fried Chicken or Pizza Hut. Then as now, these were the only available options for an American kid to get an affordable meal. By age 15, I had packed 212 pounds of torpid teenage tallow on my once lanky 5- foot -10 frame.

Dress Down:

I grew up as a typical mid 1980s own-way kid. My parents split up, my dad was off trying to reclaim his life, my mom working long hours to make ends meet. Lunch and dinner, for me, was a choice between Mc Donald's, Taco Bell, KFC or Pizaa Hut. Just as now, these were the affordable staple for an American kid. By age 15, I was an obese 212 glob on my once lanky 5 foot 10 frame.

Dress Up:

I grew up as a typical mid 1980s unsupervised kid. My parents were separated, my dad moved and was trying to start over, while my mom was working long hours to pay the monthly bills. Lunch and dinner, for me was a daily choice between McDonald's, Taco Bell, Kentucky Fried Chicken and Pizza Hut. Then, as it is now, there were the only affordable, available meals for an American kid. By age 15,I had packed 212 pounds of torpid teenage tallow on my once lanky 5 foot 10 frame.

Mix it up:

I grew up as a typical mid- 1980s latchkey kid. My parents split, my father off trying to reclaim his life, my mom working long hours trying to make ends meet. Lunch and dinner, for me was either McDonald's, Taco Bell, KFC or Pizza Hut. Then, as it is now, these were the only available options for an American kid to obtain an affordable meal. By the age of 15, I had packed 212 pound glob on my once lanky 5-foot-10 frame.
     

Think before you write

They say I say chapter 9 "Ain't so, Is Not" by Russell Durst and Cathy Birkenstein states on how Academic writing doesn’t always mean setting aside your own voice. The texts give many different ways to write in an academic and properly way by using “big words, long sentences, and complex sentences” (Birkenstein 121). The authors are trying to explain how we can write an academic structure while holding on to our voice. They give us some steps like developing a set of key terms and phrases for each text you write, and repeating yourself, but with a difference. They don't want us to drop our language we use every day, but once we walk in a classroom we should be a tad bit more professional when it comes to our vocabulary. Because everyday language shouldn’t be used in academic writing. We have to earn how to switch it on and off.

I'm going to use an article I wrote a year ago and take a paragraph from it. It was about how the police use too much force and kill innocent people. Looking back through it I saw some words that weren't very academic like and to slang for an English report. I wrote "The cops are wack and there pigs, There goes the popo or the 50 driving by" and I even shorten a word because to "bc" I can't believe I use to write this, my teacher was disappointed in me because he knew I could write better. I guess I let my anger get the better me because when people talk about the cops nothing good comes out of their mouths. And I let that come in my writing. Ever since that mistake, I learn how to turn off my slang in school and keep it in the streets where it belongs.

Text Talk

 They Say, I Say With Readings by Gerald Graff, Cathy Birkenstein, and Russel Durst, Chapter nine "Ain't so, Is Not" "Academic Writing Doesn't Always Mean Setting Aside Your Own Voice"

Talks about the many different ways to write appropriately.  "I Think, Therefore IM Text Shortcuts Invade Schoolwork, and Teachers Are Not Amused" by Jennifer 8. Lee is an adapted article from What's language got to do with it? by Keith Walters and Michal Brody. Lee explains how the English language is getting destroyed by the new language called texting with words and phrases consisting of ""brb" be right back, "l8r" later, u you, r are, b4, before".  I had to write a paper on this article so I will take a paragraph from this my paper and study it to see if I've ever used any of my own everyday expressions, words or structures.
    After looking over the first page, I've used slang such as "brb, ur, omg, btw, lol and expressions such as "Cool Story Bro!" "Poker Face meme",  "Watch out! We got a bad ass over here!"
See I was trying to make the connection between slang and phrases and how we can identify with someone who uses them. For example, Batman says "I am Batman", people know him for saying it (literally).
        A part of one of my paragraphs is this little piece of art:
"If I had to choose btwn writing like this rather then like this I would write like this “bc’ it is faster to write the txting language then it is to write the standard way of writing. Writing is supposed to be a self expression, that is why we keep journals, we jot down what we want or how we feel when we want, as well as how we want."


Works Cited:
They Say, I Say With Readings by Gerald Graff, Cathy Birkenstein, and Russel Durst, Chapter nine "Ain't so, Is Not" "Academic Writing Doesn't Always Mean Setting Aside Your Own Voice W.W Norton Company, Inc 2012 New York


 What's language got to do with it? by Keith Walters and Michal Brody. W.W Norton Company, Inc 2005 New York