Friday, September 27, 2013

Self Reflection, Not in a Mirror but in a Place Least expected.. A Book.

       Let me first say, I am not a personally big fan of fiction books, especially fantasies.  I mostly read non-historical fiction books or anything that is NOT fiction.  I have to say that it really does throws me off knowing that during all this time that i thought and consirered myself a well "educated and informed" reader, i was but most certantly an ignorant.  How little did i know that through fiction so much there is to tell for the naked eye of us; in-depth and hindsight.  That in reality what shows in reflection is our own that portraits the inner-self of humanity and its fast growing civilization, the secret world and thoughts that one dares not to show to the rest of the world.

        In Why Vampires Never Die by Guillermo del Toro and Chuck Hogan the perfect example is set.  In their understanding and knowledge of why such an old character is still alive and kicking is because it still portraits the anxieties, insecurities and fears our weak civilization still have even after centuries have passed.  Can it be that vampires are like the angels we seek and need? for their soft bosom and support?

         I personally think that in accordance to Eric Camarillo's Vampires and Why We Love Them and  Stephen King's Why We Crave Horror Movies they are basically speaking the same language.  Why? because in all three articles points out the how related they are to each other and how related we are to vampires and their horror stories.

        In all three articles it demonstrates how our anxious worries and desires are  portrayed  in the fictional characters and their stories. For example,  in Camarillo's and Del Toro the worries and desires that arouse for Dracula to be born were the back-head wish of immortality (and it still is), like how Camarillo said, "no amount of money or social power can protect someone from death".  And as mentioned earlier the sense that through a story, history can be told, well in Dracula we can see that during that time that was written where technology was not as advanced as ours now meant every corner threatened life and ricked of death. 

        Our primal urges like Del Toro said "The vampire may originate from a repressed memory we had as primates. Perhaps at some point we were out of necessity  cannibalistic", and not to forget King's theory of Why We Crave Horror Movies "The potential lyncher is in almost all of us, and every now and then, he has to be let loose to scream and roll around in grass. Our emotions and fear from their own body... It deliberately appeals to all that is worst in us..morbidity unchained, our most base instincts let free, our nastiest fantasies realized..", Camarillo's "Vampires, unlike other monsters, encapsulate the fears and desires the time periods that created them".

           So in a sense that perhaps doesn't make any sense is that we NEED them, that in every age and fiction we can find what people were afraid of and secretly wanted.  As how it was discussed during class of why such entities outbrake the law, morality and ethics and is because he who is immortal never dies therefore he doesn't have to worry about heaven or hell and eventually this entity becomes our heros and we wish we could be them.

7 comments:

  1. Late! Aside from that, this is excellent! Just be sure to reread your writing a little more closely before posting, even if it's already late ;-)

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    1. Thanks! Can you help me point out some of the areas I should work on?

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    2. Well, for instance, your second sentence doesn't make sense :-(

      "I mostly read non-historical fiction books or anything that is NOT fiction."

      You say you read fiction (as long as it's non-historical) but you don't like fiction? That's how it reads anyway :-/

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    3. Making the point about how Camarillo said, "no amount of money or social power can protect someone from death," really is key. It makes you wonder if an unending desire for blood can be a metaphor for an unending desire for money and power. Stoker's novel was definitely meant to be a cautionary tale or fable. From an imperialist perspective, during the 19th century the British were the "vampires" of their time period, going around sucking the resources from other foreign lands in their quest for endless power and wealth. Stoker was perhaps using the vampire metaphor to hint that such an unquenchable thirst for domination may be cause the of British empire's eventual destruction.

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    4. Nicely done, Dawn! We weren't going to touch on this until we'd gotten further, but you're absolutely right. I doubt Stoker meant for that to be a message/warning, but it's there nonetheless. We see it in War of the Worlds most prominently, but Dracula is definitely also an Invasion-Scare Story :-)

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  2. I really enjoyed reading this. The first paragraph was really interesting I love how you break down that fiction is a great way to learn a lot about us as people.

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    1. Thanks Maria. It was really an eye opening for me (^_^)

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