Monday, September 16, 2013

Old Vampires and New Vampires

“Vampires and Why We Love Them” by Eric Camarillo is a blog entry by a man who studies Vampires and Victorian literature/fiction. According to Camarillo he has been a Vampire fan for many years. He does a little survey in the reading where he lists all the things a person could choose from as to what they’d be if given the choice, out of reading all the options I’d agree too that I’d choose to be a Vampire (none of the other options seem too interesting). He gives some examples of different Vampire books that have been written over the years and how they have changed. He also describes them to have superheroes and be outcasts yet they fit into all genres such as drama, sci-fi, mystery and horror. These reasons are why Vampires were and still are such a big deal. The audience is getting a little bit of everything in their reading or viewing (if it's a TV show or movie).


Back in the day, Dracula may have been popular because its content wasn’t exactly proper. Meaning the horror and mostly the sexual content.  People weren’t used to reading of those things. Whereas today books, TV shows and movies such as Twilight or Vampire Diaries it is acceptable to have love scenes and sex scenes. Today’s Vampire stories contain more love story plots then anything else, we aren’t drawn too much by the violence but it is the relationship between the characters that we are most interested in. We haven’t finished reading the book so I can’t exactly say Dracula is 100% different but from the chapters we have read, the book surely doesn’t seem like what we read and watch today, Dracula is a more authentic Vampire story. It’s history and roots are stronger and more real.

13 comments:

  1. I think you are right when you say that nowadays it has turned to love scenes and sex scences. It seems that in this generation it has been transformed in order to appeal to this generations taste amd prefences.

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    1. and by love scenes taking over, everything a vampire movie or book or show should be, just isn't anymore!

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    2. I Know !!! its like all the suspense and thrill of vampire movies has turned into this guy falling in love with this girl and they forever are bonded by this and that -__- wheres the killing ?!? The gore the gasp !

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    3. HAHAHA....i do love Vampire Diaries though (dont' laugh)

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  2. you are right when you said "Today's Vampire stories contain more love story plots then anything else." That's all our generation is all about, which we need to change. It's like no one is afraid of vampires or anything else in that sort.

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    1. yea exactly because Harker is terrified of Dracula and all the peculiar things that he sees going on... yet we watch these Vampire movies & shows and there is ZERO thrill or suspense!

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  3. Hi, my name's Eric and I wrote the article you responded to. You are absolutely right that Dracula's content is what drew readers back in the day. As gothic fiction, Dracula relies on a bit of sensationalism to attract readers and to keep them reading.

    However, Dracula and The Vampire Diaries have more in common than people might think at first. For its time, Dracula was incredibly risque. Remember the scene in the castle when Harker is being eaten alive by Dracula's wives? That's an incredibly sexual scene that portrays an engaged man behaving lewdly with other women. I'm not entirely sure how Stoker got it past his editors. Then, of course, there's the infanticide immediately after. You're right, though, when you say that Vampire Diaries focuses more on love and relationships. (At least the TV show. I'm less familiar with the books.) Dracula is a novel about conquering things: Dracula wants to conquer England, the hunters want to conquer Dracula, etc.

    Anyway, this post was lovely. Have a good rest of the semester.

    --Eric

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    1. hey Eric. so yes i suppose you are right about the 3 women in the castle and the sexual reference it just seems a lot less vague then anything we watch now because that was ONE scene as opposed to Vampire Diaries, the only plot in that story is which brother Elaina is going to stay with. i did enjoy your article very much.

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  4. I 100% agree when you say vampire movies just arnt what there supposed to be anymore. It's like your supposed to be afraid when you think of vampires but now all of them are mostly romantic and barely and gore. I think the generation has changed it's views on vampires over time but there still very popular to this day!

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  5. Wow. This is an amazing conversation (which includes the author of the piece!), and I hope it continues!

    It's so interesting that several of you have commented on the idea that modern day vampires aren't what a vampire story "should be." First off, what does that even mean, what a vampire story should be? Keep in mind that Stoker's vampire was very different from the less human/more monstrous vampires of earlier literature!

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  6. Prof,

    as you also mention, Stoker's perception of a vampire is also very different.. Dracula is calm and not as violent as we would've thought him to be. what i mean when i say that vampire stories aren't what they "should be" is that most often then not, vampires are considered dangerous and evil and should be avoided. they are portrayed to be these monsters of the night and feared... in Vampire Diaries they have these day light rings so they can go out... they are controlled by witches with powerful spells.. they are rather attractive looking. But what you mentioned in class about their fear of living and eternity alone, follows in the show. the 2 vampire brothers are trying to be with the same girl because they can't live centuries without someone to go through it with.

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  7. It's also important to recognize how the vampire has been portrayed and popularized in film. Nosferatu, for example, is drastically different than that of Bella Lugosi's character--as Lugosi's is to those portrayed by Vampire Diaries and Twilight. As the vampire becomes less monstrous and more "human" in appearance, it inevitably becomes more domesticated in character, hence its desire for "love and, like, relationships."

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    1. Very true! The same thing is slowly happening with zombies, too! Movies like Fido and Warm Bodies are playing with that monstrosity, as well.

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