Thursday, July 18, 2013

Ebonics vs Academic English

Original Paragraph: (Page 128)

Although it may have been in the past, academic writing in most disciplines today is no longer the linguistic equivalent of a black-tie affair. To succeed as a writer in college, then, you need not always limit your language to the strictly formal. Although academic writing does rely on complex sentence patterns and on specialized, disciplinary vocabularies, it is surprising how often such writing draw on the language of the street, popular culture, our ethnic communities, and home. It is by blending these languages on what counts as "standard" English changes over time and the range of possibilities open to academic writers continue to grow.

Dress It Down:

Even if it be long-ago, the punishment of writing fancy words is no longer the thing. Wanna pull off writing like a pro? Well then, don’t be limiting your tongue; that means acting all serious in your writing. Though academic writing counts on difficult sentence structures and hard words, it's surprising how often our street lingos and ways of life surround our writing. It be as a result of joining these languages together making it into what they label "standard" English which changes and will continue to do so while academic writers continue to grow.

Dress It Up:

While befalling into the precedents, scholastic inscription, at the moment, essentially has no longer become the linguistic equivalent of a black-tie affair. To accomplish as a novelist, subsequently, you must not always limit your verbal communication to the strictly formal. Although scholastic inscription does rely on intricate sentence patterns and on specific, disciplinary terminologies, it is astonishing how frequently such inscription employs the verbal communications on what is considered as "standard" English revolves ultimately and the variety of possibilities open to scholastic novelists continue to cultivate.

Mix It Up:

While it may have befallen into the past, academic writing nowadays has no longer become this punishment of writing the same old fancy words. To accomplish as a writer, you must not always limit your tongue, meaning limiting your verbal communication to the strictly formal. Though academic writing does rely on difficult sentence structures and intricate vocabulary, it is surprising how frequently such writing draws on joining these languages together making it into what they label "standard" English which changes frequently and will continue to do so while academic writers continue to cultivate.


              In this chapter George Graff and Cathy Birkenstein explain how we can write effective academic arguments while holding on to our voice. Academic writing doesn’t always mean setting aside your own voice; using “big words, long sentences, and complex sentences” is not necessarily important to always use in one’s academic writing. It is rather better to use sophisticated academic words, but in order to keep hold of one’s voice while writing their piece of work, one should draw up their expressions and use their phrases using their everyday conserving language too. They suggest that we shouldn’t avoid using sophisticated, academic terms in writing, and encourage us to draw upon the kinds of expressions and the phrases we use every day when having a conversation with family and friends. It is also suggested that everyday language shouldn’t be accepted in academic writing. A writer should never limit his or her own choice of words while writing; yet a good writer should always experiment with their own personal everyday colloquial language and improve it.

1 comment: